No increase in registration fees

Published: 16 September 2016

In a welcome boost for the Scottish economy and home-buyers alike, ministers have announced that the fees charged by Registers of Scotland will remain the same – and staying at the same rate as they have been since January 2011.

The decision, which was announced by Keith Brown MSP, the Cabinet Secretary for the Economy, Jobs and Fair Work, is good news for everyone transacting a property.

Ministers have also agreed that the 25 per cent discount for applications for voluntary registration introduced in June 2015 should be maintained until at least March 2019 to accelerate progress towards completing the Land Register by 2024.

Mr Brown said: “I am pleased that once again it has been possible to support house-buyers by freezing registration fees, which have been held at their present level since 2011.

“We have also been able to extend the 25 per cent discount for applications for voluntary registration to accelerate progress towards completing the land register by 2024.”

Sheenagh Adams, the Keeper of the Registers of Scotland, said: “We will continue to support the Scottish economy by providing modern, efficient and high-quality services as we work towards the target set by ministers for Land Register completion.

“A completed Land Register will be a national asset for Scotland that will increase transparency while making property transactions easier and faster.”

ENDS

Notes to editors

  1. For more information or to request an interview, please contact Jacq Kelly on 0131 528 3738 or communications@ros.gov.uk. Communications, Registers of Scotland, Meadowbank House, 153 London Road, Edinburgh, EH8 7AU.
  2. Registers of Scotland is a non-ministerial department of the Scottish Administration and holds trading fund status. It is responsible for compiling and maintaining registers relating to property and other legal documents in Scotland. Registers of Scotland records and safeguards the rights of the individual while providing open access to information on the registers.
  3. Registers of Scotland receives no public funds. It covers its costs by charging fees for the services it provides, with the fees being set by Scottish ministers with the agreement of Parliament.
  4. Registers of Scotland maintains 17 public registers that provide for the registration of legal documents in Scotland. The two main registers are the General Register of Sasines, which dates back to 1617 and is the oldest national property register in the world. It is progressively being replaced by the land register, which was introduced in 1981, and, when completed, will provide a modern, digital, map-based register of property titles in Scotland.
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